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Thank you, 2012: Taking my theatre to new places

Painting with Words & Fire in Melbourne

As you might have seen from my Favourite Theatre 2012 list, I saw lots of theatre in lots of different places this year. I also had multiple productions of my own work across four different cities: Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and a reading in New York City.

First of all, I’d like to thank my collaborators in the Wooden Leg – our little theatre company, that’s still learning to make theatre but has plans for the future, so look out! Thank you, Wallis Murphy-Munn, Andrew Dodds and Hayley-Lawson Smith for challenging me, supporting me and giving of yourselves in the form of new works we will develop over the course of 2013.

And in chronological order:

Thank you David Attrill and Erin McMullen for their work on Like a House on Fire, as part of Short & Sweet Sydney 2012.

Thank you – please don’t let me forget anyone – Renee Palmer, Christine Husband, Adrienne Sloan, Andre Stefan White, Ryan Hodge and the team at Revolt for their work on Painting with Words & Fire. Also, a hat tip to Amy Jenkins and Fiona Bulle for their contributions and support along the way.

Thank you to Richard Di Gregorio, Chris Broadstock and Ephiny Gale for all their hard work taking Richard Di Gregorio: On Time to the Adelaide Fringe Festival. And thanks also to Jane Howard for some venue reconnaissance in the early planning stages, which I guess happened last year – but whatever, go Jane!

Thank you to Laura Iris Hill, Robert Gonyo, Hannah Finn and Rebecca Burton for the remarkable effort they put into a reading of Painting with Words & Fire at Primary Stages in New York City!

And thank you to Clara Pagone, Anna Burgess, Sean Scanlon and the Short & Sweet Melbourne team for a fun ride putting on Eight Minutes. It really was a thrill to play around with space and format, have our actors mingle with the crowd before our show opened act two.

Thank you to Tom Conyers, Nicole Taylor and Anthony Noack for continuing support in our little writers group – helping each other to make our work better before directors and actors get their grubby little hands on it.

Apart from an appearance of Poems a Dead Boy Wrote at Short & Sweet Sydney in February 2013, there are no other concrete plans for productions of my work in the new year. There are vague plans. There are scripts to be finished. There’s development to be done. Directors to talk to. Theatre companies, too.

Work continues until new shows will inevitably see the light of day.

Thank you to friends, family and audience members who supported my shows by coming to see them. And by giving me great feedback. And for enjoying yourselves. And for telling others about my work. And for taking a chance by promoting me to other audiences.

And, finally, to the Melbourne theatre-making community. I saw a lot of theatre in Melbourne this year. I loved a great deal of it and admired a great deal more. But beyond seeing such great work from so many of you, I am indebted to you all for inspiring me with your generosity; from talking to me frankly about your creative process, to inviting me to meet fellow artists and collaborators, to letting me know how appreciative you are of my work and my support.

I make theatre because I have to make theatre; I write because I can’t not write. I am so grateful that you have all made it easier to do what I love and to love what I do.

See you in 2013.

Painting with Words & Fire reading in New York

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