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Showing posts from October, 2013

A remarkable ode to the unremarkable: Nature Theatre of Oklahoma's LIFE AND TIMES

One of my favourite novels & films about the act of writing is Wonder Boysby Michael Chabon, where the character of Grady Tripp is in the midst of writing his second novel – which has reached thousands of pages long with no end in sight. The key moment in the story is when Tripp realises that writing is about making choices and the mid-life crisis he’s having is blocking is ability to make those choices, both in life and on the page.
Nature Theatre of Oklahoma’s Life and Times (Parts 1 to 4) is full of a lot of very deliberate choices, particularly in the creation and development of the script – but also in its direction, production and acting styles. But where it reminds me of Wonder Boys is in its unfinished nature and its insistence that it not conform to typical narrative tricks or structures.
Life and Times is the story of the life of one of the ensemble of actors who works with the Nature Theatre of Oklahoma. She has been interviewed by phone by the artistic directors of the …

What I saw, you won't see: The Rabble's ROOM OF REGRET

I want to tell everybody to rush out to see The Rabble’s Room of Regret at Theatreworks.
But I need to warn them they will not see the show I saw.
I want to try to explain what I saw and how I felt.
But I don’t want to give anything away.
I want to see it again.
But I don’t.
Room of Regret, The Rabble’s response to Oscar Wilde’s “The Picture of Dorian Gray,” is an immersive theatre piece that explores notions of vanity – but refuses to let you see the whole picture. The audience is broken up into small groups, led to one or other of the many rooms – and then the show asks the viewer to confront hilarious, graphic, absurd and brutal scenes, while refusing to give anything away. At least, to begin.
And yet I know some audience members never left the seat they were first assigned. I know some who were given freedom to explore, didn’t explore. I know there were moments too gross to watch and some too brutal to look away from.
Our reaction to theatre is always our own. We bring our own liv…