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Showing posts from February, 2017

Asia TOPA – Kagerou, Little Emporers

Kagerou, Arts House
The Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011 was known the world over as the Fukushima disaster, named after the nuclear power plant that was heavily damaged by the earthquake and subsequent tsunami.
Kagerou, subtitled A Study in Translating Performance, focuses on the experiences of one woman, Kyoko, a survivor of the earthquake.
Director and creator Shun Hamanaka has created a documentary experience, with performer Yoko Ito live-translating interviews conducted with Kyoko over the years since the tragedy.
The original interviews with Kyoko form part of an aural soundscape, while we hear the performer tell the story in English. Translation is key to the performance; we are being brought into Kyoko’s world but are still held at a slight distance.
We see projections of images filmed at Hisanohama; images that are mostly still but move just a little. It’s delicate and subtle, much like Ito’s performance – there are no bold moves or grand acting moments, just a reporting o…

The Book of Mormon, The Encounter

I’ve already written a review for AussieTheatre this year – MTC’s production of Born Yesterday – but I want to try to write a little something about all the theatre I see this year.

The Book of Mormon

Back in 2012, I saw The Book of Mormon on Broadway after lining up for a few hours to get standing-room-only tickets. My sister and I stood at the back of the stalls, behind people who probably paid $300 for their seats. I’ve never been so happy to stand before.

Four and a half years later, the show has made it to Melbourne and I’m so glad to have seen it again. It’s not a soundtrack I listen to a lot and it’s not a show I think about much, but it’s so fun in the theatre. I think I even enjoyed it more this second time, maybe because I paid for a seat this time? I remembered parts but I’d forgotten others. I noticed details I had missed before.

I also think it’s smarter than I first gave it credit for. The satire on religion is not subtle, but the look at Africa through the lens of Mormo…